Living History: Exploring the Legacy of the 1400-Year-Old Ginkgo Tree

Since mid-November, a Ginkgo tree growing next to the Gu Guanyin Buddhist Temple in the Zhongnan Mountains has been shedding yellow leaves, transforming the temple into a sea of yellow. Every year in the fall, this beautiful tree sheds its leaves, leaving behind a stunning carpet of yellow foliage.

image

The Ginkgo tree, also known as the maidenhair tree, is often referred to as a “living fossil” because, despite the drastic climate changes over millions of years, it has remained unchanged for more than 200 million years. It serves as a living link to the time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

image

This 1,400-year-old Ginkgo tree is located within the walls of the Gu Guanyin Buddhist Temple in the Zhongnan Mountain region of China. As its leaves fall and create a vibrant sea of gold every autumn, tourists from around the world flock to witness this breathtaking sight. However, this year, due to the global pandemic, only people in China have had the opportunity to view this marvel. Visitors eagerly wait for the chance to capture photos of this colorful spectacle.

image

The golden leaves begin to fall in October, transforming the temple grounds and the surrounding landscape into a yellow ocean. It’s the perfect celebration of autumn. This Ginkgo tree’s resilience, despite climatic changes, spanning over 200 million years, is truly fascinating. It serves as a living connection to a time when dinosaurs ruled the Earth.

image

In addition to its magical yellow hues during the fall, this particular species of Ginkgo tree also offers practical uses. Not only does it provide a source of food, but it also boasts various medicinal benefits recognized in traditional Eastern medicine.

image

Ginkgo biloba, commonly known as Ginkgo or maidenhair tree, is the only living species in the Ginkgophyta division, with all other related species having gone extinct. Also known as the maidenhair tree, this ancient species dates back to some 270 million years, as evidenced by fossils.

image

Related Posts

16 Most Bizarre Mushroom And Fungi Species In The World

With about 14,000 described mushrooms currently inhabiting dank forest floors, decaying tree trunks, and dung piles, there are bound to be some strange-looking varieties. Some depart entirely from the toadstool silhouette—the stereotypical rounded-cap-atop-a-stem …

Read more

Very Cute! The artist deftly turns leaves into dozing young birds

Jardin des Plantes, one of the ten main parks, is located in Nantes, France. It’s a seven-hectare botanical garden with approximately 10,000 different species and 5,000 different flowers. Besides enormous greenhouses and amazing statues, the park also …

Read more

The Amazing Mutant Butterfly That Attracts a Mate by Glow Continuously for 48 Hours and Changes Colors at Will

The world is full of beautiful and graceful butterflies, but one stands out above the rest – the mutant butterfly. This unique insect, scientifically known as Greta oto, can be found in Central and South America and possesses some remarkable abilities …

Read more

Earth’s Botanical Behemoth: The 30-Foot ‘Century Bloom’ Queen of the Andes

The Queen of the Andes is the world’s largest bromeliad, standing over 30 feet tall and blooming only once in a century. This rare and incredible plant is a true wonder of nature …

Read more

This bizarre moon photo appears to be of a large eye peering through a desert rock arch

Surreal Moon Photo Looks Like a Huge Eye Peeking Through a Rock Arch in the Desert At the eпd of OсtoƄer, photographer Zach Cooley veпtᴜred to Arсhes …

Read more

Snapdragons: Nature’s Jekyll and Hyde, From Vibrant Blooms to Skulls

When they’re alive, Snapdragons make beautiful flowers. But when the seed pods die, something peculiar happens… the dead flower heads resemble miniature human skulls. And if squeezed  between the fingertips, the skull will open and close its mouth. …

Read more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *